Test your child's nerves with this science experiment To help your child learn how nerves work, fill three large bowls with water: one with icy, one hot (not scalding), and one room temperature. Have your child put one hand in the hot bowl and one in the cold for one minute. Next, put your child's hot hand in the room temperature bowl. Ask, "Is it hot or cold?" Do the same with the cold hand. Your child's hot hand will feel cold, and the cold hand will feel hot, even though both are in the same water. That's because nerves sense temperature changes relative to what they are used to. https://tpitip.com/?12kB18889
19 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Math makes sense when you spell it out Writing numbers out in word form is a good way for your child to understand the mathematical concept of place value. Write a list of four or five numbers, such as 562, 73, 184, 16 and 43. Have your child write them in words: five hundred sixty-two, seventy-three, and so on. Then try it in reverse. Write down the words and ask your child to write the numbers.
21 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Give your child acceptable words to express strong feelings At one time or another, many parents will hear "I hate you" from their child. When kids lash out with angry words, it's important not to overreact. Wait until you are both calm, and then explain to your child that "hate" is a hurtful word and it isn't acceptable. Offer some alternative things to say when upset, such as "I'm angry," or "I'm disappointed." https://tpitip.com/?12kF18889
22 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Test stress eases when students prepare Children with test anxiety are so afraid of failing that they can't do their best. It doesn't help to tell them to relax. What does help is preparation. Help your child find a quiet study space. Then help your student spread studying out over several days. Make sure that your child gets enough sleep, and on test day, offer encouragement: "I know you will do well. You're prepared." https://tpitip.com/?12kE18889
23 days ago, Mike Schartiger
More choices can reduce power struggles Power struggles with elementary schoolers are losing battles. To avoid them, give your child options rather than orders. "Would you like to do your reading now or after dinner?" Just be sure you can live with all the options you offer. If some things are out of the question, say so. "You may choose when to do your assignments, but the rule is that there is no screen time until schoolwork is done." https://tpitip.com/?12kC18889
25 days ago, Mike Schartiger
If you have a child in Preschool, you should have received a parent survey. If you have not done so already, please complete this survey and return it to the board of education office or your child's school. The survey is also accessible online at https://wvde.state.wv.us/forms/prek-parent-survey/.
25 days ago, WC Director of Student and Administrative Support
Math makes sense when you spell it out Writing numbers out in word form is a good way for your child to understand the mathematical concept of place value. Write a list of four or five numbers, such as 562, 73, 184, 16 and 43. Have your child write them in words: five hundred sixty-two, seventy-three, and so on. Then try it in reverse. Write down the words and ask your child to write the numbers. https://tpitip.com/?12je18889
28 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Talk with your child about school safety Families have an important role to play in making school a safer place. Start by talking to your child about life in and out of school. Kids often know about situations that could turn violent before adults do. Encourage your child to tell you, or a trusted adult at the school, about any potential trouble or danger. Review the school rules with your child, and make it clear that you support them. https://tpitip.com/?12jd18889
29 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Family meals are a recipe for school success Sharing meals as a family gives parents and children a chance to communicate and support one another. That contributes to children's success in school. Family meals don't have to be fancy. The easier the food is to cook, the more time you'll have together. Let your child help. Include everyone in the conversation around the table. And if you can't eat dinner together, try breakfast, or dessert at the end of the day. https://tpitip.com/?12jc18889
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
How to find books that will turn your child on to reading The "right" books for your child aren't necessarily expensive. What matters is that they make your child want to read them. Look for books that match your child's current interests. Choose books that are well-written, with strong plots and well-developed characters. Most of the words should be familiar to your child, but it's OK if a book is a little challenging. You can read it aloud now, and your child can read it independently later on. https://tpitip.com/?12ja18889
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
Give spelling a high-tech twist Kids love technology, and it can make studying spelling words more fun. Encourage your child to type the latest word list into a word-processing program. Let your child play with fonts, colors and designs while retyping each word several times. Your child can even add pictures and print out the work for a memorable study guide. https://tpitip.com/?12jZ18889
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
Give spelling a high-tech twist Kids love technology, and it can make studying spelling words more fun. Encourage your child to type the latest word list into a word-processing program. Let your child play with fonts, colors and designs while retyping each word several times. Your child can even add pictures and print out the work for a memorable study guide. https://tpitip.com/?12jZ18889
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
Help your child map the world on a pumpkin globe To teach your child about world geography, get a round pumpkin. Pretend that the stem end is the North Pole, and the blossom end on the bottom is the South Pole. The pumpkin's grooves are like lines of longitude. Have your child measure halfway between the poles and draw the equator around the pumpkin. Then, help your student refer to maps or a globe to draw the continents in the correct hemispheres. https://tpitip.com/?12jY18889
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
To motivate your child, praise effort, not intelligence Did you know that praising your child for being smart may not be a great idea? In one experiment, researchers found that children who had been told they were smart avoided doing tasks that were learning challenges. Other kids, who had been told they were hard workers, stayed motivated to tackle the challenges and learn. Praise your child for effort, rather than intelligence. Send the message that hard work pays off. https://tpitip.com/?12jX18889
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
Make concentrating on schoolwork easier for your child To get the most out of schoolwork, children must be able to focus on it. Sticking with a regular daily study time will help your child turn attention to reading or assignments more easily. Nearby TVs and other distracting devices should be off. If your child has trouble concentrating, set a timer for five minutes and have your child work until it rings. Allow a one-minute break, then reset the timer. Gradually increase the time you set. https://tpitip.com/?12jW18889
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
Practice tests help kids prepare for the real thing Research has shown that one of the most effective ways students can study for tests is by taking practice tests. When your child faces an upcoming test, use review sheets the teacher has sent home, past worksheets, and questions at the end of a textbook chapter to quiz your child's understanding of the topic. Having to recall the information helps reinforce it in your child's mind. https://tpitip.com/?12jT18889
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
Make time for math activities every day Not every child is a math whiz. But daily practice can help all students strengthen their math skills. It's important, for example, that students understand math vocabulary, so have your child explain the terms in schoolwork to you. Practice basic math facts together by quizzing with flash cards and playing math games. For word problems, encourage your child to read the problem several times and draw a picture to help understand the question. https://tpitip.com/?12jQ18889
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
One family calendar helps you keep track of everything Has your child ever forgotten about a science project until the last minute? Or didn't have a ride to practice because you were at work? A family calendar can help you avoid scheduling issues. On it, write school events, your child's assignments, reminders about items that must go to school on certain days, sports practices, activities, commitments and special events. You'll be able to keep track of everything and spot conflicts ahead of time so you can manage them. https://tpitip.com/?12jP18889
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
For better behavior, predict, prepare and practice When it comes to correcting behavior, don't wait until after a problem arises to plan what to do. Instead, think "predict, prepare, practice." Predicting a behavior lets you brainstorm ways to prevent it. Then you can try out your solutions. For example, if you predict your child will be late in the morning, prepare by having your student lay out clothes the night before. For practice, see if your child can set a "personal best" time for getting dressed. https://tpitip.com/?12jO18889
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
Keep an eye on your child's after-school schedule After-school activities can enrich your child's life. But sometimes, even a good thing can be too much. From time to time, review your child's schedule. Does your child enjoy all the activities? Does your student have time to complete assigned work? Does your child have time to read, play and relax? Do activities cause stress? If you suspect your child is overcommitted, talk together about dropping an activity. https://tpitip.com/?12jM18889
about 2 months ago, Mike Schartiger