School counselors are helping teens move forward Many people mistakenly assume that school counselors are there only to help students get into college. But they do much more, including helping students and families cope with the pandemic's effects. Counselors can help students set goals, solve problems, handle conflicts and monitor progress. They can guide students' course selection to maximize future options and help find resources for extra help. Counselors will make time to meet with students and parents who ask. https://tpitip.com/?31iX18889
about 21 hours ago, Mike Schartiger
Let your child know that science and math are for everyone Research suggests that children's attitudes toward math and science tend to be set in elementary school, and their parents' attitudes play a part in this. Support success in these subjects by expressing confidence in your child's abilities to master them. Point to diverse role models, and let your child know that math and science are for everyone, not just one kind of person. https://tpitip.com/?11iX18889
about 21 hours ago, Mike Schartiger
Reinforce your teen's sense of self-respect Many teens deny their own talents and adapt their personalities to fit in. Encourage your teen to ask, "Who am I and what do I want?" instead of always asking "What must I do to make these people like me?" Help your student identify and pursue personal strengths, talents and interests. At home, model the respect and equality you want your teen to feel in the outside world. https://tpitip.com/?31iW18889
2 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Encourage creative writing, one sentence at a time A little daily writing practice helps your child build skills. To make it fun, give her a special notebook and ask her to write down the first sentence of a made-up story. Then each day, have her add one sentence, and only one, to move the story along. It's helpful to set aside a regular time for this writing. Once a week, have her add an illustration. In time, your child will have written an imaginative and fun story. https://tpitip.com/?11iW18889
2 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Limits provide structure that lets your teen grow Your teen may be telling you that he is old enough to do what he wants. But teens are too young to make all their own decisions. They need limits to stay out of trouble and learn responsibility. Limits also show teens that their parents care about them. Once you and your teen establish rules and consequences, change them only when you both agree he has proved he can handle more responsibility. https://tpitip.com/?31iV18889
3 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Can you collect all the letters on an alphabet hike? Turn an ordinary walk into an alphabet hike and have some learning fun! Have your child write the alphabet on a piece of paper. Then grab a grocery bag and set out together to find one item that starts with each letter. Pull up a Dandelion, pick up a Penny, dig for a Worm. When you get home, ask your child to arrange the items in alphabetical order. https://tpitip.com/?11iV18889
3 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Quick phone look-ups don't lead to long-term learning Research shows that when students look up answers to schoolwork questions on their phones, they often don't remember them long term—and they score lower on tests of the material later. Encourage your teen to find the answer for herself—by solving the problem, checking her notes or looking in a textbook. After she's got it, she can use her phone to double-check. https://tpitip.com/?31iU18889
4 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Give your child an encouraging signal to keep on trying Your child has been working to master a new skill, but her work shows that she still doesn't understand it. Your words can motivate her…or cause her to give up. Replace "You're still not getting it," with "You haven't quite mastered this yet." The word "yet" sends a signal that your child can get the answer if she just keeps trying. Children are more likely to keep working when they believe they can succeed. https://tpitip.com/?11iU18889
4 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Sharpen your teen's focus with three goals a day Here's a simple exercise that can help your teen focus on fundamentals: Each morning, ask him to spend a few minutes setting up three goals for the day. What is the most important thing he can do today for School? For Self? For Someone else? Focusing on these three S's helps teens get in the habit of thinking about what they can and should do, rather than on worries and concerns they can't do anything about. https://tpitip.com/?31iT18889
5 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Being your child's 'study buddy' is just as important as ever Parents everywhere acted as study buddies for their children last year. This is a vital role to keep playing, even when pandemic conditions improve. Listen as your child reads aloud, and make sure he understands assignment instructions. Help him organize information for a report or use flash cards to study for a test. And whenever possible, notice and praise his efforts and progress. https://tpitip.com/?11iT18889
5 days ago, Mike Schartiger
The Emergency Broadband Benefit will provide a discount of up to $50 per month toward broadband service for eligible families and households who are struggling to stay connected during the #COVID19 pandemic. Eligible households can also receive a discount of up to $100 for the purchase of a laptop, desktop computer, or tablet from participating providers. For more info, please visit: fcc.gov/broadbandbenefit. #DigitalDivide #BroadbandForAll
15 days ago, Mike Schartiger
Broadband for all
Welcome back students and staff! We hope you have the best year yet.
about 1 month ago, Mike Schartiger
Back to school
The summer SOLE programs at each school were AMAZING this year. Thanks to all those involved!
about 2 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Students growing their own food
High School students working on a real world problem
Lots of water safety activities and fun