Make reading a fun and frequent family activity - https://tpitip.com/?32cR18889
9 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Help your child hear what fluent reading sounds like - https://tpitip.com/?12cP18889
9 months ago, Mike Schartiger
The Webster County Board of Education held a meeting on Friday, February 18, 2022 and voted to adjust our Covid-19 school protocols. · Effective Monday, February. 21, 2022, face coverings will become optional for all students and staff members in school facilities and on school buses due to our decline in positivity rates. · There will be no contact tracing within schools. · If a student or staff member tests positive for Covid-19 they must quarantine for 5 days and may return to work or school on day 6 if they are asymptomatic. · Parents, just a reminder, that if your child is showing symptoms of illness, please contact your physician and refrain from sending them to school until they are asymptomatic. · Please continue to utilize effective hygiene strategies such as hand washing and utilization of hand sanitizer. Thank you for your cooperation, Scott Cochran Superintendent Webster County Schools
9 months ago, Webster County BOE
We are loving our new app! Access documents, news updates, and even emergency notifications, right from your pocket. Download the app on Android: https://bit.ly/3oKNJ3n or iPhone: https://apple.co/3ukSWjE.
9 months ago, Webster County High School
Its everything webster, in your pocket.  Document, events, staff dirctory, alerts, news
We’re thrilled to announce Webster County Board of Education’s new app! It’s everything Webster, in your pocket. Download the app on Android: https://bit.ly/3oKNJ3n or iPhone: https://apple.co/3ukSWjE.
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Celebrate the season with art projects - https://tpitip.com/?11kC18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Healthy snack choices encourage positive food habits Healthy food is fuel for growing bodies and brains. To help your child learn to make nutritious food choices, create an "anytime" shelf in your refrigerator. Stock it with a selection of healthy foods such as carrot sticks, broccoli "trees," cheese, chunks of melon and raisins. Then allow your child to help himself from this shelf any time he is hungry. He'll like choosing, and you'll know he's making healthy choices. https://tpitip.com/?11jR18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Get to the heart of homework problems If your student never seems to do homework, the situation calls for problem-solving. Instead of criticizing, ask questions: Is he afraid of missing the bus if he takes time to gather the materials he needs? Are his books too heavy for his long walk home? Does he routinely check the online notices for the class? Once you and your teen have identified the issue, you can discuss ways to solve it. https://tpitip.com/?31jM18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Share strategies for success on tests right from the start Before your teen starts to answer test questions, she should do a few things that can make a difference to her score. Teach your teen to write down key information she's studied, like formulas or dates, at the top so she'll have them to refer to when answering questions. Then she should read the instructions carefully and figure out how much time she has for each question. Now she's ready to do her best. https://tpitip.com/?31jL18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Address mistakes respectfully and privately Elementary school students are learning the social skills that help make a classroom comfortable and productive, such as how to treat people with respect. When your child makes mistakes, don't point them out in front of others. That will only make him ashamed, not teach him to be considerate. Ask yourself what he needs to learn, then teach him those skills one-on-one. https://tpitip.com/?11jL18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Missing school changes lives … and not in a good way Sooner or later, every teen will stumble out of bed and whine, "Do I have to do school today?" Your answer can be short and simple: "Yes." Students who often miss school earn lower grades than those who attend regularly. They may not learn the foundation skills needed to understand the next unit's material. What's more, they don't develop the responsible habits that will make them successful in life. https://tpitip.com/?31jK18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Daily conversations show your child that schoolwork matters Talking with your child about school shows her you care about her life and her education. Make it a regular habit to have your child show you at least one example of her schoolwork each day. Comment on progress she's making, praise her effort and encourage her to do her best work. You'll learn more about what your child is learning, and your child will learn that schoolwork is important. https://tpitip.com/?11jK18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Share tips for creating a study group that really works Study groups can help teens strengthen and enhance learning. When forming a study group, your teen should choose members he knows and likes, but who aren't such good friends that socializing overpowers learning. Group members should write down goals and create a plan for meeting them. Taking turns leading the group encourages all members to share the responsibility for its success. https://tpitip.com/?31jH18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Anger often masks other emotions Disrespectful, angry children may be perfectionists—and very good students. Or they may show their anger and disrespect by doing poorly in school. Anger and disrespect are often a cover for other emotions, such as fear or frustration. If your child has recently begun behaving defiantly, think about what's changed in her life. Ask what's bothering her and say you want to help. Then discuss ways to change her behavior. https://tpitip.com/?11jH18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Discuss ways your teen can contribute to school safety Students can do a lot to help make school a safe place. Talk to your teen about actions she could take. For example, she could train to be a peer counselor and help others settle disputes. Encourage her to make new students feel welcome and part of the school. And if your teen is aware that someone has made threats or has a weapon on school property, she should report it immediately. https://tpitip.com/?31jG18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Teach listening by example There isn't a class at school called "Listening." That's because listening is important in ALL school classes. One of the best ways to teach your child to listen is to set an example. Each day, set aside some time to talk about school. Ask questions to get the ball rolling. Then stop what you're doing and pay attention to what your child is saying. Make eye contact as you listen, and give your child time to put thoughts into words. https://tpitip.com/?11jG18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Academic fitness helps your teen compete in life Schools across the nation are working to help students become "academically fit" so they can succeed in an increasingly competitive world. To help at home, set high (but still realistic) expectations for your teen's achievement. Encourage daily reading and frequent writing. Then, find out what he is learning in core subjects like math, science, history and English, and help him relate the material to what's going on in the world or in your lives. https://tpitip.com/?31jF18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
A 'checkbook' can help your child account for money Giving a child an allowance is one way to teach financial responsibility. But you may not always have the right cash on hand. Give your child a "checkbook." Make up some checks that look like the real thing. On the first day of the month, "deposit" your child's allowance in the checkbook. When he needs to make a purchase, he can write you a check, and you can pay for the item. He'll get practice writing and learn math skills in the bargain. https://tpitip.com/?11jF18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Bust the myths that prevent math success Does your teen believe that "You're either born a math person or you're not"? This is a common math myth. Give your teen the facts: Great teaching and hard work are what make someone a math person. Here's another myth to bust: "Math takes too much memorization and repetition." The truth is that math is about learning patterns. Once a student is familiar with them, the problems make sense and the math starts to be fun. https://tpitip.com/?31jD18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Rev up your read-aloud routine Want to strengthen your child's vocabulary, improve her reading scores and have fun…all in 20 minutes a day? Read aloud! Try these hints for effective read-alouds: Pick a regular reading time and stick to it. Look for books you'll both like. If you preview them yourself first, you can read them aloud with style for your child. Finally, stop each reading session while your child is still eager to hear what will happen next. https://tpitip.com/?11jD18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger